MLB the RNG 20

SDS

Has SDS ever commented on this? The fact that there is no way 'skill' your way between good/good, good/pop up and other random outcomes makes me believe that it is scripted 100%...RNG. Don't even get me started on the bs odds that are given to us. But seriously, what is this for?

SDS

@DoIHearBossMusic said in MLB the RNG 20:

Has SDS ever commented on this? The fact that there is no way 'skill' your way between good/good, good/pop up and other random outcomes makes me believe that it is scripted 100%...RNG. Don't even get me started on the bs odds that are given to us. But seriously, what is this for?

SDS should comment and address to the community. There are so many questions and a lot to explain to the community but their feedback is just not existent. I personally think that they not answering our questions is just disrespectful.

SDS

@TeamPotro said in MLB the RNG 20:

@DoIHearBossMusic said in MLB the RNG 20:

Has SDS ever commented on this? The fact that there is no way 'skill' your way between good/good, good/pop up and other random outcomes makes me believe that it is scripted 100%...RNG. Don't even get me started on the bs odds that are given to us. But seriously, what is this for?

SDS should comment and address to the community. There are so many questions and a lot to explain to the community but their feedback is just not existent. I personally think that they not answering our questions is just disrespectful.

Just wait. They might delete your comment...

SDS

They have the worst programmers in the history of gaming

SDS

Sadly, it's now only a game of skill in the same way poker is a game of skill. Outside of the 1% of 1% of players, one's skill is really only apparent in the aggregate which is super frustrating and, IMO, kind of defeats the purpose of an action-oriented video game, especially H2H. But whatever.

In their defense (kinda), I get why SDS does it - the skill gap in this game is so large that if it played straight up, top players might be hitting .600+ while bad players would struggle to hit .100.

IMO, it would be a lot of fun but I'm sure they have backend data that tells them a large portion of the folks that spend $$ on stubs would fit into that latter category and, I assume, would quit out of frustration once they figured out they couldn't buy themselves wins anymore.

SDS

@jz2016cubs said in MLB the RNG 20:

@TeamPotro said in MLB the RNG 20:

@DoIHearBossMusic said in MLB the RNG 20:

Has SDS ever commented on this? The fact that there is no way 'skill' your way between good/good, good/pop up and other random outcomes makes me believe that it is scripted 100%...RNG. Don't even get me started on the bs odds that are given to us. But seriously, what is this for?

SDS should comment and address to the community. There are so many questions and a lot to explain to the community but their feedback is just not existent. I personally think that they not answering our questions is just disrespectful.

Just wait. They might delete your comment...

Dint think so. I’m not being disrespectful and I’m not swearing. I just think they need to be more responsible and ethical when it comes to communicating with us. In fact, a lot of the disagreements that we’ve seen in this forum could’ve been avoided if they would answer our questions.

SDS

@Hoofartid said in MLB the RNG 20:

Sadly, it's now only a game of skill in the same way poker is a game of skill. Outside of the 1% of 1% of players, one's skill is really only apparent in the aggregate which is super frustrating and, IMO, kind of defeats the purpose of an action-oriented video game, especially H2H. But whatever.

In their defense (kinda), I get why SDS does it - the skill gap in this game is so large that if it played straight up, top players might be hitting .600+ while bad players would struggle to hit .100.

IMO, it would be a lot of fun but I'm sure they have backend data that tells them a large portion of the folks that spend $$ on stubs would fit into that latter category and, I assume, would quit out of frustration once they figured out they couldn't buy themselves wins anymore.

You’re close, but not quite on the money. The most basic way to explain the micro transaction system is this; players fall into three general categories. Elite, Skilled and Bad.
Skilled players aren’t profitable at all. If you’re skilled enough to go on a 12 win streak in BR or events and consistently make WS, you can earn enough stubs by winning and selling the rewards that it’s totally unnecessary to spend money.

Elite players are slightly different, particularly the streamers, as they are apt to dump a good amount into the game early in the year in order to obtain Mays, Mantle or whoever in order to garner more views and have access to the best cards in the game for their viewing audience. This obviously benefits SDS, as does the free publicity they gain from Twitch and so on.

The Bad players are the goldmine. They can’t go on a 12 win streak in events or BR, they probably won’t make WS consistently either. They don’t work the market, because it’s “boring”. They also buy many, many packs. Even if they pull a decent diamond, ultimately, it’s getting sold and going back to packs more often than not. When they see a card they neeeeed for their team, maybe the WS reward Griffey, or 12-0 Glavine, they can’t earn it by playing. They may decide to save stubs and not buy packs. They may grind to 300 stars and sell the boss. They’ll probably still be short. Then along comes a stub sale. Tempting, right? It’s the only way you’ll get that Griffey or whoever after all.

The trick is repeating this move with better cards throughout the year, adding exchanges that drain stubs, charging to enter showdowns that bad players won’t beat easily, basically ensuring that the bad players are tempted to buy shiny packs, waste stubs and stay broke. They won’t quit, as long as they pull the odd diamond here and there and the content keeps rolling out. Just keep them engaged and they’ll eventually buy.

SDS

@ComebackLogic said in MLB the RNG 20:

@Hoofartid said in MLB the RNG 20:

Sadly, it's now only a game of skill in the same way poker is a game of skill. Outside of the 1% of 1% of players, one's skill is really only apparent in the aggregate which is super frustrating and, IMO, kind of defeats the purpose of an action-oriented video game, especially H2H. But whatever.

In their defense (kinda), I get why SDS does it - the skill gap in this game is so large that if it played straight up, top players might be hitting .600+ while bad players would struggle to hit .100.

IMO, it would be a lot of fun but I'm sure they have backend data that tells them a large portion of the folks that spend $$ on stubs would fit into that latter category and, I assume, would quit out of frustration once they figured out they couldn't buy themselves wins anymore.

You’re close, but not quite on the money. The most basic way to explain the micro transaction system is this; players fall into three general categories. Elite, Skilled and Bad.
Skilled players aren’t profitable at all. If you’re skilled enough to go on a 12 win streak in BR or events and consistently make WS, you can earn enough stubs by winning and selling the rewards that it’s totally unnecessary to spend money.

Elite players are slightly different, particularly the streamers, as they are apt to dump a good amount into the game early in the year in order to obtain Mays, Mantle or whoever in order to garner more views and have access to the best cards in the game for their viewing audience. This obviously benefits SDS, as does the free publicity they gain from Twitch and so on.

The Bad players are the goldmine. They can’t go on a 12 win streak in events or BR, they probably won’t make WS consistently either. They don’t work the market, because it’s “boring”. They also buy many, many packs. Even if they pull a decent diamond, ultimately, it’s getting sold and going back to packs more often than not. When they see a card they neeeeed for their team, maybe the WS reward Griffey, or 12-0 Glavine, they can’t earn it by playing. They may decide to save stubs and not buy packs. They may grind to 300 stars and sell the boss. They’ll probably still be short. Then along comes a stub sale. Tempting, right? It’s the only way you’ll get that Griffey or whoever after all.

The trick is repeating this move with better cards throughout the year, adding exchanges that drain stubs, charging to enter showdowns that bad players won’t beat easily, basically ensuring that the bad players are tempted to buy shiny packs, waste stubs and stay broke. They won’t quit, as long as they pull the odd diamond here and there and the content keeps rolling out. Just keep them engaged and they’ll eventually buy.

I would love to know who the profitable players are. You very well may be right. But, I see many World Series players here who spent a lot of money on drop and who were happy to take advantage of the stub sale.

By your statement, I would be categorized as a bad player (no offense taken), but I will probably never spend money because 50 dollars is not worth the investment. Am I the norm or abnormal.

Streamers also put a lot of money into the company because their viewers essentially give them money to open packs.

I am not trying to argue with you. Just thinking out looks

SDS

@ComebackLogic said in MLB the RNG 20:

@Hoofartid said in MLB the RNG 20:

Sadly, it's now only a game of skill in the same way poker is a game of skill. Outside of the 1% of 1% of players, one's skill is really only apparent in the aggregate which is super frustrating and, IMO, kind of defeats the purpose of an action-oriented video game, especially H2H. But whatever.

In their defense (kinda), I get why SDS does it - the skill gap in this game is so large that if it played straight up, top players might be hitting .600+ while bad players would struggle to hit .100.

IMO, it would be a lot of fun but I'm sure they have backend data that tells them a large portion of the folks that spend $$ on stubs would fit into that latter category and, I assume, would quit out of frustration once they figured out they couldn't buy themselves wins anymore.

You’re close, but not quite on the money. The most basic way to explain the micro transaction system is this; players fall into three general categories. Elite, Skilled and Bad.
Skilled players aren’t profitable at all. If you’re skilled enough to go on a 12 win streak in BR or events and consistently make WS, you can earn enough stubs by winning and selling the rewards that it’s totally unnecessary to spend money.

Elite players are slightly different, particularly the streamers, as they are apt to dump a good amount into the game early in the year in order to obtain Mays, Mantle or whoever in order to garner more views and have access to the best cards in the game for their viewing audience. This obviously benefits SDS, as does the free publicity they gain from Twitch and so on.

The Bad players are the goldmine. They can’t go on a 12 win streak in events or BR, they probably won’t make WS consistently either. They don’t work the market, because it’s “boring”. They also buy many, many packs. Even if they pull a decent diamond, ultimately, it’s getting sold and going back to packs more often than not. When they see a card they neeeeed for their team, maybe the WS reward Griffey, or 12-0 Glavine, they can’t earn it by playing. They may decide to save stubs and not buy packs. They may grind to 300 stars and sell the boss. They’ll probably still be short. Then along comes a stub sale. Tempting, right? It’s the only way you’ll get that Griffey or whoever after all.

The trick is repeating this move with better cards throughout the year, adding exchanges that drain stubs, charging to enter showdowns that bad players won’t beat easily, basically ensuring that the bad players are tempted to buy shiny packs, waste stubs and stay broke. They won’t quit, as long as they pull the odd diamond here and there and the content keeps rolling out. Just keep them engaged and they’ll eventually buy.

Interesting. So do you think SDS could actually be doing themselves a disservice by increasing the RNG/lowering the skill gap?

Admittedly, most of the information I've read regarding MTX strategy is based on simple mobile games where they try to make it as 'skill-less' as possible. More about accumulating than getting better.

SDS

@MathMan5072 said in MLB the RNG 20:

@ComebackLogic said in MLB the RNG 20:

@Hoofartid said in MLB the RNG 20:

Sadly, it's now only a game of skill in the same way poker is a game of skill. Outside of the 1% of 1% of players, one's skill is really only apparent in the aggregate which is super frustrating and, IMO, kind of defeats the purpose of an action-oriented video game, especially H2H. But whatever.

In their defense (kinda), I get why SDS does it - the skill gap in this game is so large that if it played straight up, top players might be hitting .600+ while bad players would struggle to hit .100.

IMO, it would be a lot of fun but I'm sure they have backend data that tells them a large portion of the folks that spend $$ on stubs would fit into that latter category and, I assume, would quit out of frustration once they figured out they couldn't buy themselves wins anymore.

You’re close, but not quite on the money. The most basic way to explain the micro transaction system is this; players fall into three general categories. Elite, Skilled and Bad.
Skilled players aren’t profitable at all. If you’re skilled enough to go on a 12 win streak in BR or events and consistently make WS, you can earn enough stubs by winning and selling the rewards that it’s totally unnecessary to spend money.

Elite players are slightly different, particularly the streamers, as they are apt to dump a good amount into the game early in the year in order to obtain Mays, Mantle or whoever in order to garner more views and have access to the best cards in the game for their viewing audience. This obviously benefits SDS, as does the free publicity they gain from Twitch and so on.

The Bad players are the goldmine. They can’t go on a 12 win streak in events or BR, they probably won’t make WS consistently either. They don’t work the market, because it’s “boring”. They also buy many, many packs. Even if they pull a decent diamond, ultimately, it’s getting sold and going back to packs more often than not. When they see a card they neeeeed for their team, maybe the WS reward Griffey, or 12-0 Glavine, they can’t earn it by playing. They may decide to save stubs and not buy packs. They may grind to 300 stars and sell the boss. They’ll probably still be short. Then along comes a stub sale. Tempting, right? It’s the only way you’ll get that Griffey or whoever after all.

The trick is repeating this move with better cards throughout the year, adding exchanges that drain stubs, charging to enter showdowns that bad players won’t beat easily, basically ensuring that the bad players are tempted to buy shiny packs, waste stubs and stay broke. They won’t quit, as long as they pull the odd diamond here and there and the content keeps rolling out. Just keep them engaged and they’ll eventually buy.

I would love to know who the profitable players are. You very well may be right. But, I see many World Series players here who spent a lot of money on drop and who were happy to take advantage of the stub sale.

By your statement, I would be categorized as a bad player (no offense taken), but I will probably never spend money because 50 dollars is not worth the investment. Am I the norm or abnormal.

Streamers also put a lot of money into the company because their viewers essentially give them money to open packs.

I am not trying to argue with you. Just thinking out looks

Interested to hear Comeback's response as well but I would assume streamers would fall into the 'elite' category for this game, despite their actual skill level. None of this stuff is black & white so maybe elite for this game = high exposure (which is likely due to their skill level, but not always).

For your question about bad players, as of a couple years ago the sweet spot for users spending money was ~2%. So even though bad players may be more LIKELY to spend money, it's still a very small percentage that actually do.

SDS

My hope is that this strategy starts to backfire. This is the only game I really want to play, but I absolutely hate it. It makes me miserable. I would consider myself an average to below average player. I would be much more likely to spend money on a game that gave me consistent and repeatable feedback on my input, rather than most of my outcomes just chalked up to chance. I feel as if there’s no point to having better cards. I would like Mantle, and I would be tempted to spend a little of my actual money to acquire him if I thought that for one second, he would make that much of an impact on the game. This game feels so off right now, and hopefully enough of the marginal players will start giving up on it like I am tempted to do. Then maybe they will reconsider the type of game they want to put out.

SDS

@Hoofartid said in MLB the RNG 20:

@MathMan5072 said in MLB the RNG 20:

@ComebackLogic said in MLB the RNG 20:

@Hoofartid said in MLB the RNG 20:

Sadly, it's now only a game of skill in the same way poker is a game of skill. Outside of the 1% of 1% of players, one's skill is really only apparent in the aggregate which is super frustrating and, IMO, kind of defeats the purpose of an action-oriented video game, especially H2H. But whatever.

In their defense (kinda), I get why SDS does it - the skill gap in this game is so large that if it played straight up, top players might be hitting .600+ while bad players would struggle to hit .100.

IMO, it would be a lot of fun but I'm sure they have backend data that tells them a large portion of the folks that spend $$ on stubs would fit into that latter category and, I assume, would quit out of frustration once they figured out they couldn't buy themselves wins anymore.

You’re close, but not quite on the money. The most basic way to explain the micro transaction system is this; players fall into three general categories. Elite, Skilled and Bad.
Skilled players aren’t profitable at all. If you’re skilled enough to go on a 12 win streak in BR or events and consistently make WS, you can earn enough stubs by winning and selling the rewards that it’s totally unnecessary to spend money.

Elite players are slightly different, particularly the streamers, as they are apt to dump a good amount into the game early in the year in order to obtain Mays, Mantle or whoever in order to garner more views and have access to the best cards in the game for their viewing audience. This obviously benefits SDS, as does the free publicity they gain from Twitch and so on.

The Bad players are the goldmine. They can’t go on a 12 win streak in events or BR, they probably won’t make WS consistently either. They don’t work the market, because it’s “boring”. They also buy many, many packs. Even if they pull a decent diamond, ultimately, it’s getting sold and going back to packs more often than not. When they see a card they neeeeed for their team, maybe the WS reward Griffey, or 12-0 Glavine, they can’t earn it by playing. They may decide to save stubs and not buy packs. They may grind to 300 stars and sell the boss. They’ll probably still be short. Then along comes a stub sale. Tempting, right? It’s the only way you’ll get that Griffey or whoever after all.

The trick is repeating this move with better cards throughout the year, adding exchanges that drain stubs, charging to enter showdowns that bad players won’t beat easily, basically ensuring that the bad players are tempted to buy shiny packs, waste stubs and stay broke. They won’t quit, as long as they pull the odd diamond here and there and the content keeps rolling out. Just keep them engaged and they’ll eventually buy.

I would love to know who the profitable players are. You very well may be right. But, I see many World Series players here who spent a lot of money on drop and who were happy to take advantage of the stub sale.

By your statement, I would be categorized as a bad player (no offense taken), but I will probably never spend money because 50 dollars is not worth the investment. Am I the norm or abnormal.

Streamers also put a lot of money into the company because their viewers essentially give them money to open packs.

I am not trying to argue with you. Just thinking out looks

Interested to hear Comeback's response as well but I would assume streamers would fall into the 'elite' category for this game, despite their actual skill level. None of this stuff is black & white so maybe elite for this game = high exposure (which is likely due to their skill level, but not always).

For your question about bad players, as of a couple years ago the sweet spot for users spending money was ~2%. So even though bad players may be more LIKELY to spend money, it's still a very small percentage that actually do.

You’re probably right. I think the reality is that all groups spend money. Well 2% of 1000000 is 20,000. So, who are the 20,000 that spend? And of that 20,000 who spends the most? Who is more likely to spend as an online player? Someone in pennant race trying to make ds? Someone in division hoping to make ws? Or someone in ws who wants to be ultra competitive? I think arguments can be mad equally for all three of those groups.

SDS

@MathMan5072 said in MLB the RNG 20:

@ComebackLogic said in MLB the RNG 20:

@Hoofartid said in MLB the RNG 20:

Sadly, it's now only a game of skill in the same way poker is a game of skill. Outside of the 1% of 1% of players, one's skill is really only apparent in the aggregate which is super frustrating and, IMO, kind of defeats the purpose of an action-oriented video game, especially H2H. But whatever.

In their defense (kinda), I get why SDS does it - the skill gap in this game is so large that if it played straight up, top players might be hitting .600+ while bad players would struggle to hit .100.

IMO, it would be a lot of fun but I'm sure they have backend data that tells them a large portion of the folks that spend $$ on stubs would fit into that latter category and, I assume, would quit out of frustration once they figured out they couldn't buy themselves wins anymore.

You’re close, but not quite on the money. The most basic way to explain the micro transaction system is this; players fall into three general categories. Elite, Skilled and Bad.
Skilled players aren’t profitable at all. If you’re skilled enough to go on a 12 win streak in BR or events and consistently make WS, you can earn enough stubs by winning and selling the rewards that it’s totally unnecessary to spend money.

Elite players are slightly different, particularly the streamers, as they are apt to dump a good amount into the game early in the year in order to obtain Mays, Mantle or whoever in order to garner more views and have access to the best cards in the game for their viewing audience. This obviously benefits SDS, as does the free publicity they gain from Twitch and so on.

The Bad players are the goldmine. They can’t go on a 12 win streak in events or BR, they probably won’t make WS consistently either. They don’t work the market, because it’s “boring”. They also buy many, many packs. Even if they pull a decent diamond, ultimately, it’s getting sold and going back to packs more often than not. When they see a card they neeeeed for their team, maybe the WS reward Griffey, or 12-0 Glavine, they can’t earn it by playing. They may decide to save stubs and not buy packs. They may grind to 300 stars and sell the boss. They’ll probably still be short. Then along comes a stub sale. Tempting, right? It’s the only way you’ll get that Griffey or whoever after all.

The trick is repeating this move with better cards throughout the year, adding exchanges that drain stubs, charging to enter showdowns that bad players won’t beat easily, basically ensuring that the bad players are tempted to buy shiny packs, waste stubs and stay broke. They won’t quit, as long as they pull the odd diamond here and there and the content keeps rolling out. Just keep them engaged and they’ll eventually buy.

I would love to know who the profitable players are. You very well may be right. But, I see many World Series players here who spent a lot of money on drop and who were happy to take advantage of the stub sale.

By your statement, I would be categorized as a bad player (no offense taken), but I will probably never spend money because 50 dollars is not worth the investment. Am I the norm or abnormal.

Streamers also put a lot of money into the company because their viewers essentially give them money to open packs.

I am not trying to argue with you. Just thinking out looks

I’m a bad player, I was describing myself in ‘17 and ‘18 down to a tee. Even though I absolutely hated ‘18, it was mostly because of the content and that didn’t become apparent until midway through the year. By that time I’d spent heavily on souvenirs already, I’d guess I was in for £1000 or more on stubs that year, I’d regularly buy 150k or more.

I remember a turning point being around the all star break, the game was grind heavy with all the souvenirs and playing the Rockies on rookie, I was really hoping for something to break the monotony after a long gap with no meaningful content and SDS released a garbage flashback Matt Holliday card. It was around then that I realised players like myself, who complained incessantly about various issues, but continued to spam the buy now banner during every stub sale, were the root cause of the problem.

Last year, I spent very little in comparison to the previous games, mostly because SDS knocked it out of the park with free content and all cards were useable in H2H. I did buy a few stubs here and there, as I recall, but I have no problem spending additional money on a decent product that I spend a lot of time with, entertainment costs money, no matter what you do to pass the time, but as I said, it was minimal. This year, I think I’ve brought stubs twice, only 11k to complete a collection or buy something if I was short, but still, in my opinion, I fall squarely into the bad player category. If I was happy with the gameplay this year, I’d be quite happy to keep spending, for all my critical analytical views on micro transactions. That’s what makes me one of the goldmine bad players, you see. That’s why I get pissed off with this game and post on here about how terrible it all is, then keep right on playing. What can you do? At least I’m honest about it.

SDS

The RNG is a way to balance out the the different methods of hitting input and to keep stats somewhat realistic.

I don’t understand why they care if stats are realistic in DD. We are already playing with unrealistic lineups.

SDS

@soreal35 said in MLB the RNG 20:

The RNG is a way to balance out the the different methods of hitting input and to keep stats somewhat realistic.

I don’t understand why they care if stats are realistic in DD. We are already playing with unrealistic lineups.

Its all about the money my friend. I tried giving mlb the rng ranked seasons another try today and im greatly regretting it as i broke my controller out of frustration. This is the only game that angers me this much.

Was pitching a complete gem with Oswalt. My opponent had pretty bad pitch recognition. Struck out 9 times by the 6th inning. All 3 of his runs came from home runs (not mad about this). I had about 8 center pci good/ok’s.

SDS

I have mlb 19 still and play it once in awhile, but everything you're talking about is the reason why I didnt bother buying mlb 20 the show. Despite loving and playing this game for the last decade and always buying the latest version. The [censored] is so real with the programming and it's REALLY frustrating. Obnoxious. When I hear that they've made this game straight up, then I'll buy it again.

Just make ACTUAL divisions. The bad players will play against the bad players until the graduate to the next level. It's already in the game, but clearly it doesn't really matter that much. It's gotten to a point where when I match with someone who is clearly bad (bad record, swings at everything early on, throws pitches right down the middle) that I just roll my eyes cause I know what frustrating game I'm about to play. Give me someone whose closer to my skill level so that the game be kept fairly without the [censored] forced stuff to keep the shitty player from quitting forever. Instead I'm closer to quitting forever. The guy whose been loyal for a decade.

SDS

@Hoofartid said in MLB the RNG 20:

Sadly, it's now only a game of skill in the same way poker is a game of skill. Outside of the 1% of 1% of players, one's skill is really only apparent in the aggregate which is super frustrating and, IMO, kind of defeats the purpose of an action-oriented video game, especially H2H. But whatever.

In their defense (kinda), I get why SDS does it - the skill gap in this game is so large that if it played straight up, top players might be hitting .600+ while bad players would struggle to hit .100.

IMO, it would be a lot of fun but I'm sure they have backend data that tells them a large portion of the folks that spend $$ on stubs would fit into that latter category and, I assume, would quit out of frustration once they figured out they couldn't buy themselves wins anymore.

Why would bad players hit any worse my guy? Guys in 400 would still play other guys at 300-500. Unless you are suggesting that bad players never even square the ball up vs other bad players as is, then okay. But if you arent good. And you do finally square a couple up, that end up as good mother bleeping okay flyouts, wouldnt that be far worse gaming experience than getting rewarded a few times a game on some fluky hits? Idk. A better game would make everyone happy man. All levels.

SDS

My issue isn't RNG, it's that I got the Angel Hernandez edition, where I can have games in DD where Rickey is clearly safe at third, but is called out, and I'm not allowed to challenge because Angel Hernandez is an omnipotent god who can never be wrong and is pervasive in my game

SDS

@yanksthebest said in MLB the RNG 20:

They have the worst programmers in the history of gaming

That's not fair to say. The ones who did 17 and 18 might not still be there...but then again the ones this year responsible for fielding might be....ehhhh....nevermind ...proceed

SDS

@MannyJay24 said in MLB the RNG 20:

@soreal35 said in MLB the RNG 20:

The RNG is a way to balance out the the different methods of hitting input and to keep stats somewhat realistic.

I don’t understand why they care if stats are realistic in DD. We are already playing with unrealistic lineups.

Its all about the money my friend. I tried giving mlb the rng ranked seasons another try today and im greatly regretting it as i broke my controller out of frustration. This is the only game that angers me this much.

Was pitching a complete gem with Oswalt. My opponent had pretty bad pitch recognition. Struck out 9 times by the 6th inning. All 3 of his runs came from home runs (not mad about this). I had about 8 center pci good/ok’s.

Ditto, no game aggravates me as much as this one. NO GAME. If it's not the buggy gameplay, it's the bs odds they give you in packs. And if everything just happen to go right they hit you with a network error. Typically a shatter a controller per year on this game alone. I need a punching bag with this mess.