Meter Pitching How to Explained

SDS

Alot of people seem to be struggling with this pitch type. I have been using meter since 2011 as my main preference. Dabbled in analog and pulse didn't like it so i stuck with meter. So i am going to try to explain how to get the most out of it. My settings are Meter/Classic/Pitcher View. I use classic b/c the arrows give you idea of how much your pitch is gonna break and shows direction of the pitch break. My explanation will be referred to from righty point of view, for lefty's you just do opposit in some cases.

When talking about meter itself there are things to know about it. Full power every pitch will use stamina more frequently, but it also has an advantage, it gives you more time to react to what i call "stop point line." Now if you are concerned about stamina then you can stop the initial starting point early but it will mean you have to react quicker at stop point.

Why is this important? Well the stop point actually has 3 uses. If you stop it right on the line this is going to react best to your placement and the PAR, pitch should go within that area. Now the other two uses can come handy for other situations. Stopping left side of stop point is going to give your pitch more movement to the left (for pitches like slurve or curveball benefit best from this.) And right side of line your pitch is gonna have a push type feel to it. Great for throwing slider inside or a curveball you wanna get inside more. But regardless what pitch you throw if you are on right or left of stop point line the pitch is gonna move.

How much movement you ask? Well every pitch is gonna react different based on several things. Factors you need to consider are. These are key b/c their are so many different combinations that will change your pitching. For instance if you pitch Coors Field in April 7pm clear skies you will need to pitch differently at Coors in august @4pm with overcast.

Elevation

Time of day

Weather

And last but not least the most important 9 squares within the zone and the 12 invisible squares outside the zone.

Elevation is important b/c that could be one of the hardest things to keep in your mindset in a 9 inning game is reminding yourself what elevation you are at. I like to practice stadium elevation in 3 groups.

  • Below 300 ft

-300 ft to 800 ft

-800 ft too highest Elevation

Time of day plays a factor in this as well for various reasons, it goes hand in hand with weather essentially. Think of it like this if it's April 7pm @ above 800ft it's gonna be colder than a ballpark @ 20ft in April 7pm. It will still be cool b/c it is still April but ball will react different wether its the pitch itself or when ball make contact.

Now let's talk about the squares.

This is the hardest thing to master in regards to meter pitching along with when and where to stop your meter. Every square has a movement associated with it. I will leave this to you to practice rather than explain what every square does. 1. Because i don't have them memorized. 2. To many combination of outcomes to try to memorize. But i will say this each and every square inside and outside reacts differently, sometimes it will be vague and sometimes the line seperating 2 boxes can make a difference.

This is one of main reasons i use classic b/c those arrow indicators are going to tell me how much break that pitch is gonna have in that peticular square. And then factor in other things i talked about and soon you will be on your way to creating your own unique style of pitching that i promise if you work hard and practice it will match PPP.

I hope this helps somebody understand meter pitching better. Go practice this and come back lemme know if this helped or not. 👍

SDS

@Collin_SDS i meant put in General discussion for franchise and RTTS players to benefit from as well . Could you plz move it for me? Thx in advance.

SDS

@grizzbear55_psn said in Meter Pitching Explained:

Alot of people seem to be struggling with this pitch type. I have been using meter since 2011 as my main preference. Dabbled in analog and pulse didn't like it so i stuck with meter. So i am going to try to explain how to get the most out of it. My settings are Meter/Classic/Pitcher View. I use classic b/c the arrows give you idea of how much your pitch is gonna break and shows direction of the pitch break. My explanation will be referred to from righty point of view, for lefty's you just do opposit in some cases.

When talking about meter itself there are things to know about it. Full power every pitch will use stamina more frequently, but it also has an advantage, it gives you more time to react to what i call "stop point line." Now if you are concerned about stamina then you can stop the initial starting point early but it will mean you have to react quicker at stop point.

Why is this important? Well the stop point actually has 3 uses. If you stop it right on the line this is going to react best to your placement and the PAR, pitch should go within that area. Now the other two uses can come handy for other situations. Stopping left side of stop point is going to give your pitch more movement to the left (for pitches like slurve or curveball benefit best from this.) And right side of line your pitch is gonna have a push type feel to it. Great for throwing slider inside or a curveball you wanna get inside more. But regardless what pitch you throw if you are on right or left of stop point line the pitch is gonna move.

How much movement you ask? Well every pitch is gonna react different based on several things. Factors you need to consider are. These are key b/c their are so many different combinations that will change your pitching. For instance if you pitch Coors Field in April 7pm clear skies you will need to pitch differently at Coors in august @4pm with overcast.

Elevation

Time of day

Weather

And last but not leat the most important 9 squares within the zone and the 12 invisible zones outside the zone.

Elevation is important b/c that could be one of the hardest things to keep in your mindset in a 9 inning game is reminding yourself what elevation you are at. I like to practice stadium elevation in 3 groups.

  • Below 300 ft

-300 ft to 800 ft

-800 ft too highest Elevation

Time of day plays a factor in this as well for various reasons, it goes hand in hand with weather essentially. Think of it like this if it's April 7pm @ above 800ft it's gonna be colder than a ballpark @ 20ft in April 7pm. It will still be cool b/c it is still April but ball will react different wether its the pitch itself or when ball make contact.

Now let's talk about the squares.

This is the hardest thing to master in regards to meter pitching along with when and where to stop your meter. Every square has a movement associated with it. I will leave this to you to practice rather than explain what every square does. 1. Because i don't have them memorized. 2. To many combination of outcomes to try to memorize. But i will say this each and every square inside and outside reacts differently, sometimes it will be vague and sometimes the line seperating 2 boxes can make a difference.

This is one of main reasons i use classic b/c those arrow indicators are going to tell me how much break that pitch is gonna have in that peticular square. And then factor in other things i talked about and soon you will be on your way to creating your own unique style of pitching that i promise if you work hard and practice it will match PPP.

I hope this helps somebody understand meter pitching better. Go practice this and come back lemme know if this helped or not. 👍

So max power makes it easier to hit the target on the meter at the expense of velocity and has nothing to do with pitch break or velocity?

SDS

@codywolfgang_xbl said in Meter Pitching Explained:

@grizzbear55_psn said in Meter Pitching Explained:

Alot of people seem to be struggling with this pitch type. I have been using meter since 2011 as my main preference. Dabbled in analog and pulse didn't like it so i stuck with meter. So i am going to try to explain how to get the most out of it. My settings are Meter/Classic/Pitcher View. I use classic b/c the arrows give you idea of how much your pitch is gonna break and shows direction of the pitch break. My explanation will be referred to from righty point of view, for lefty's you just do opposit in some cases.

When talking about meter itself there are things to know about it. Full power every pitch will use stamina more frequently, but it also has an advantage, it gives you more time to react to what i call "stop point line." Now if you are concerned about stamina then you can stop the initial starting point early but it will mean you have to react quicker at stop point.

Why is this important? Well the stop point actually has 3 uses. If you stop it right on the line this is going to react best to your placement and the PAR, pitch should go within that area. Now the other two uses can come handy for other situations. Stopping left side of stop point is going to give your pitch more movement to the left (for pitches like slurve or curveball benefit best from this.) And right side of line your pitch is gonna have a push type feel to it. Great for throwing slider inside or a curveball you wanna get inside more. But regardless what pitch you throw if you are on right or left of stop point line the pitch is gonna move.

How much movement you ask? Well every pitch is gonna react different based on several things. Factors you need to consider are. These are key b/c their are so many different combinations that will change your pitching. For instance if you pitch Coors Field in April 7pm clear skies you will need to pitch differently at Coors in august @4pm with overcast.

Elevation

Time of day

Weather

And last but not leat the most important 9 squares within the zone and the 12 invisible zones outside the zone.

Elevation is important b/c that could be one of the hardest things to keep in your mindset in a 9 inning game is reminding yourself what elevation you are at. I like to practice stadium elevation in 3 groups.

  • Below 300 ft

-300 ft to 800 ft

-800 ft too highest Elevation

Time of day plays a factor in this as well for various reasons, it goes hand in hand with weather essentially. Think of it like this if it's April 7pm @ above 800ft it's gonna be colder than a ballpark @ 20ft in April 7pm. It will still be cool b/c it is still April but ball will react different wether its the pitch itself or when ball make contact.

Now let's talk about the squares.

This is the hardest thing to master in regards to meter pitching along with when and where to stop your meter. Every square has a movement associated with it. I will leave this to you to practice rather than explain what every square does. 1. Because i don't have them memorized. 2. To many combination of outcomes to try to memorize. But i will say this each and every square inside and outside reacts differently, sometimes it will be vague and sometimes the line seperating 2 boxes can make a difference.

This is one of main reasons i use classic b/c those arrow indicators are going to tell me how much break that pitch is gonna have in that peticular square. And then factor in other things i talked about and soon you will be on your way to creating your own unique style of pitching that i promise if you work hard and practice it will match PPP.

I hope this helps somebody understand meter pitching better. Go practice this and come back lemme know if this helped or not. 👍

So max power makes it easier to hit the target on the meter at the expense of velocity and has nothing to do with pitch break or velocity?

From my experience each side of the stop line is where you can manipulate the movement, the main movement of pitch will be determined by square and a pitcher's attribute and other factors i mentioned above elevation,time, weather. The expense would be stamina not velocity. You will see slight change in velocity but it will not be a consistant loss of velocity.

SDS

Well explained. Still will never use anything but meter. Never did realize the elevation factors and such made such a big difference. I usually throw and pray..lol

SDS

@thaghettoblasta said in Meter Pitching Explained:

Well explained. Still will never use anything but meter. Never did realize the elevation factors and such made such a big difference. I usually throw and pray..lol

Ty i appreciate it. In regards to elevation, sliders for instance in higher elev. If you are using classic if you have the 1 or 2 arrows outside the zone it will break in on a lefty batter really nice. Then you can play around with the stop point manipulation areas i mention and get the same look but different movement. 🙂 👍

SDS

Move to General Discussion plz?

SDS

One other thing i wanted to mention but forgot. If you are New to meter pitching, go into Settings/Gameplay/Pitching select API to ON. This is great for practice, the catcher will give you a reccomended pitch, then a glove will show up telling you where the pitch should end up. Use it as an indicator to learn how to get your pitch movement to that spot. API "Will Not" be active in online play.