Those 107 mph double play balls

SDS

I’m just curious guys. We’ve all experienced the perfect/perfect ground ball right at a fielder who casually turns a double play with it.

Are there any statistics out there on balls hit with that kind of exit velocity being turned in real life? Can big leaguers easily turn 107mph groundballs right at them?

SDS

Not sure about turning double plays on it but you can ask Sean Manaea if Marcus Semien can field a 106+ MPH screamer off the bat of Hanley Ramirez and make a throw to 2B that finishes off a no-hitter?

Answer: Yes
https://www.mlb.com/news/sean-manaea-throws-12th-no-no-in-a-s-history-c273262350

SDS

If they can field the ball turning double plays is a lot easier on hard hit balls than slow rollers. The problem is in real life no one hits 107 MPH balls on the ground lol. The hardest hit non-homers are line drives typically/screamers down the line. If its hit right at them the hard part is certainly fielding the ball. Turning 2 is easy

SDS

@the_dragon1912 said in Those 107 mph double play balls:

If they can field the ball turning double plays is a lot easier on hard hit balls than slow rollers. The problem is in real life no one hits 107 MPH balls on the ground lol. The hardest hit non-homers are line drives typically/screamers down the line. If its hit right at them the hard part is certainly fielding the ball. Turning 2 is easy

Aaron Judge hit a ball 118mph into a force out. Yordan Alvarez hit one 117mph with a negative launch angle and was forced for an out.

Statcast leaderboard exit velocity

SDS

Great answers, you guys. The Hanley groundball to Semien really does not look like it was that hot off the bat. I guess it is a good thing I’m not an mlb shortstop!

SDS

@halfbutt said in Those 107 mph double play balls:

Great answers, you guys. The Hanley groundball to Semien really does not look like it was that hot off the bat. I guess it is a good thing I’m not an mlb shortstop!

Just looking at it, you’re right, but here you go!
5th video down
https://www.mlb.com/news/11-facts-about-sean-manaea-s-no-hitter-c273323840

SDS

Well, I'm not sure how common it is, but the classic Giancarlo Stanton example used, (used to be classified as the hardest-hit ball in the statcast era), was a double play https://www.mlb.com/cut4/giancarlo-stanton-hits-hardest-ball-recorded-by-statcast-c183198514

SDS

So it seems it is not that much of a stretch, based on these statcast videos. Cool.

SDS

Makes a big difference when the ball hits the grass a couple times. That’s why launch angles get so much attention, balls travel a lot further when with reduced friction, drag, and back spin to keep them elevated

SDS

Hardest hit grounder as per statcast turned into a double play: 2016 Giancarlo Stanton,. 123.9 MPH.

SDS

Ground balls in general iirc have an MLB average of around 200. It only slightly increased with balls hit over 100mph. There was a list somewhere that had MLB averages based on ground balls, line drives, fly balls.

It also had exit velo averages for each category, one sub 90, one sub 100, and one above 100. It was compiled over a few seasons, no idea how to find it though.

SDS

@halfbutt said in Those 107 mph double play balls:

I’m just curious guys. We’ve all experienced the perfect/perfect ground ball right at a fielder who casually turns a double play with it.

Are there any statistics out there on balls hit with that kind of exit velocity being turned in real life? Can big leaguers easily turn 107mph groundballs right at them?

Its 107mph off the bat. That really isnt that hard to field. Especially for ground balls. Once it hits the ground it losses significant velo. Then again it is easier to catch a 107mph off the bat line drive then it is a grounder. But yeah. Seems a lot do find there way right to a fielder.

Exit Velos in this game are much slower than IRL though that is for sure.